A discussion on the religious themes in the film the matrix

Neo, a software developer by day and computer hacker by night, is recruited by an underground rebel named Morpheus. Morpheus explains that Neo and everyone else has been living in is an illusion generated by a massive computer called the Matrix. The Matrix, in turn, is powered by the biologically-created electricity of millions of humans that are wired to it in a dream-like state. Neo physically breaks free of the Matrix and, now in the real world, attempts to expose the illusion with Morpheus and other rebels.

A discussion on the religious themes in the film the matrix

Themes The Blurred Line Between Humans and Machines The films of the Matrix trilogy pit man against machine in a clearly drawn battle, but they also reveal that the humans are more machinelike than they think, and that the machines possess human qualities as well.

The humans, for their part, are as relentlessly driven as machines. Her actions suggest her love, but her love expresses itself not so much as passion or emotion than as ceaseless, frenzied activity.

Their incredible fighting skills and superhuman strength seem to put them in the machine category, and their fluid movements are the result of programs that have been downloaded into them.

The Agents, by contrast, are fluid, adaptive, and creative. They shift seamlessly throughout the programs and listen intently to human speech, responding accordingly and sensitively.

When Agent Smith removes his glasses and orders the other Agents out of the room in a decidedly unmachinelike manner so he can confess something personal to Morpheus, he infuses his speech with human emotions such as disgust and horror.

Indeed, Smith seems to become almost desperately human, and his endless replication of himself is decidedly egocentric.

A discussion on the religious themes in the film the matrix

With the line between man and machine blurred to the point almost of disappearing, the Matrix trilogy raises the complicated question of how interdependent man and machine actually are, or might be.

One fear of artificial intelligence is that technology will entrap us in level upon level of dependence, and in the trilogy Neo discovers more and more about the thoroughness and subtlety of the Matrix. As long as humans turn to technology to solve human problems, humans and technology are interdependent.

In the trilogy, the machines are dependent on the humans for life, and they grow and harvest humans so they can continue to exist. Free Will in the Matrix and the Real World When Morpheus asks Neo to choose between a red pill and a blue pill, he essentially offers the choice between fate and free will.

In the Matrix, fate rules—since the world is preconstructed and actions predetermined, all questions already have answers and any choice is simply the illusion of choice.

In the real world, humans have the power to change their fate, take individual action, and make mistakes. The real world is a mess, dangerous and destitute. Cypher, who regrets choosing the red pill and ultimately chooses to return to the Matrix, views any pleasure, even false pleasure, as better than no pleasure at all.

Neo, Morpheus, Trinity, and the others in Zion, of course, value free will and reality no matter how unpleasant they may be.

SparkNotes: The Matrix Trilogy: Themes

The Matrix trilogy suggests that everyone has the individual responsibility to make the choice between the real world and an artificial world.

Though Neo is the exemplar of free will, fate plays a large role in his adventure. Neo relies on the Oracle, and everything she says comes true in some way. Nonetheless, the Oracle is always right, raising doubts about how much free Neo actually has.

In this sense, she shares the same final goals as Morpheus, Neo, and Trinity, and together they actively shape the future. The Relationship Between Body, Brain, and Mind The Matrix trilogy explores the interconnection between the body, the brain, and the mind, especially how that connection changes when the world turns out to be an illusion.

Two different kinds of humans populate the world of the Matrix films: People in the Matrix can feel physical sensations, which are created by the mind, and the Matrix trilogy makes it clear that the body cannot live without the mind.

If skills, such as fighting skills, are downloaded into the brain, and if the mind is free, a person can control his or her body as if he or she actually has had these skills all along.From a Christian perspective, “The Matrix” is a mixed bag.

The basic story is one of a Messiah come to save an enslaved humanity. However, worked in among this story is a touch of Eastern religion, a fair amount of profanity (including using Christ’s name), and a heavy dose of violence.

A summary of Faiths and Religions in 's The Matrix Trilogy.

A discussion on the religious themes in the film the matrix

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Matrix Trilogy and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

At the end of the movie Neo challenges The Matrix by accusing it of being afraid of change. Neo goes on to say that he envisions a world without The Matrix, without rules and controls, without boundaries or borders, where anything is possible.

A LIST OF PHILOSOPHICAL FILMS. Below is a categorized list of about noteworthy films that deal with philosophical and religious themes.

For a more comprehensive list of around titles, see the Philosophy and Film monstermanfilm.com numbers are included for Videos and DVDs in UT Martin’s library.

Movie Discussion Bible Studies Not only are movies extremely popular, they are one of the more powerful media expressions of our time. These multi-session Bible studies can help your group harness that power and think about the issues and ideas embedded in various films from a Christian perspective.

A summary of Faiths and Religions in 's The Matrix Trilogy. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Matrix Trilogy and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION IN FILM: A LIST